Whistling Past the Graveyard by Susan Crandall

//ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?ServiceVersion=20070822&OneJS=1&Operation=GetAdHtml&MarketPlace=US&source=ac&ref=qf_sp_asin_til&ad_type=product_link&tracking_id=dantra0c-20&marketplace=amazon&region=US&placement=1476740046&asins=1476740046&linkId=BWQ4W6FG4Q7KR5GE&show_border=true&link_opens_in_new_window=trueIt is impossible to forget the title of this book, as the narrator repeats it at least twenty-seven times throughout Whistling Past the Graveyard. The phrase refers to the act of distracting yourself from uncomfortable circumstances by doing something pleasant, or fixating on sunnier pastures. If asked to use the phrase in a sentence, I would say: “To get through Whistling Past the Graveyard, I was forced to whistle past the graveyard. Haha, I am so darn witty.
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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

I never pegged myself as a fan of Young Adult fiction, but I am coming to learn that I just have a distaste for Young Adult fiction that incorporates supernatural elements. I loathed Twilight, but I loved The Fault in Our StarsThe Tiger’s Curse was a painful, painful experience, but The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian was truly delightful. Delightful feels like the wrong word to use here, because the story is something of an emotional roller coaster. Nevertheless, it is well-written with an unforgettable narrator, and for that reason, it’s something that young adults should be reading. Continue reading “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie”